Book Review | Self Portrait With Boy by Rachel Lyon

Lu Rile inhabits a crumbling tower block of artists in residence, part of an early 1990s Brooklyn on the cusp of gentrification. She struggles to make ends meet working in the local health food shop while pursuing her dreams of photography. The art world is a ruthless one, and Lu’s life isn’t easy. To impose … Continue reading Book Review | Self Portrait With Boy by Rachel Lyon

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Book Review | Ordinary People by Diana Evans

Michael and Melissa and Stephanie and Damien are Londoners, slipping quietly into their late thirties and into a stifling domesticity that comes with the ordinariness of mortgages and children and responsibility. Pink Floyd talked about hanging on in quiet desperation as ‘the English way,’ and while this song is not part of the soundtrack of … Continue reading Book Review | Ordinary People by Diana Evans

Book Review | The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

Gilead: a frightening, theocratic nation-state, a place where the deepest, darkest desires of Christian fundamentalism have come to life. Driven by a literal interpretation of old-testament ideologies, modern-day America has been transformed into a place where obedience is everything; deviation means death. In a world where environmental destruction has caused mass infertility, those who are … Continue reading Book Review | The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

Book Review | The Heart’s Invisible Furies by John Boyne

The post-war Irish political and social landscape was one bordering on theocracy: a nation held in the vicelike grip of the Catholic church. And 1940's Ireland is not a good time to find yourself unmarried, pregnant, and alone on the sprawling streets of Dublin. Catherine Goggin has been banished from her hometown by the village … Continue reading Book Review | The Heart’s Invisible Furies by John Boyne